Going Back to School in a Pandemic: Tip 2

Going Back to School in a Pandemic: Tip 2

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Making sure that you are connected to your student(s)’ school and teachers helps to decrease stress and anxiety, while ensuring that everyone knows what to expect when returning. For older students, encourage them to take the lead on staying informed, but be sure to follow up and make sure you are in the loop as well.

Going Back to School in a Pandemic: Tip 1

Going Back to School in a Pandemic: Tip 1

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Regardless of how students will return to school this year, it is safe to say that the school year will look different for all of us.   The uncertainty around the logistics of learning in a pandemic can cause added stress for the entire family.  This series will focus on providing tips for families to return to school in a happy, healthy, and safe way. 

Our first tip is to intentionally reflect as a family about returning to school – discussing what family members are fearful and anxious about, as well as what excites them.   These conversations can help family members work through the complex emotions and worries that can stem from going back to school in an unprecedented time.  

Asking questions to reflect on how your student feels can help you understand and anticipate where you may need to provide added support. Encourage your student to share openly and be honest with them yourself! Sharing your perspectives as a parent will help your student understand that they’re not alone and will encourage working together as a family when it’s time to return to school. 

Talking openly and consistently as a family will help keep everyone on the same page, minimizing stress for everyone once the school year starts up again.

Coping with Stress During Tough Times: Tip 5

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Tip 5: Seek professional help before the stress becomes overwhelming.  

Oftentimes, people will wait until a problem becomes a crisis before getting professional help, but it’s important to remember that most mental health professionals are equipped to help people get through crisis situations, as well as to help people prevent them in the first place.  Learning coping strategies for anxiety or conflict resolution strategies for your relationship from a professional, for example,  can help you to reduce stress overall in your life. 

Getting help before a small issue becomes a crisis can help you not only deal with stress during tough times, but it can also help you strengthen your relationship with yourself and others.

Coping with Stress During Tough Times: Tip 4

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Tip 4: Remember it’s okay to rely on your support system to help you get through tough times. 

It is human nature to avoid asking for help. Combine that with a society that tends to stigmatize vulnerability, and many of us end up shutting out our loved ones when we are going through a difficult time. Ironically, this can only make tough times tougher.

Instead of shutting them out, try reaching out and sharing your feelings with someone you trust.  They may be able to offer a different perspective or comforting words, and you may end up finding that support from a loved one is exactly what you needed to overcome a difficult moment.

Reaching out to people that we love and trust for support can help to reduce stress and to feel supported during tough times.

 

Coping with Stress During Tough Times: Tip 3

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Tip 3: During tough, stressful times, go back to the basics such as drinking water and staying active. 

When things get challenging, taking care of our basic needs can reduce stress and help to find the balance in our emotions and thoughts. Consistently drinking water, eating well, and staying active can help us begin to feel better and see things more clearly. While doing these things may seem simple, they often get overlooked when we are highly stressed or dealing with difficult circumstances.  During tough times, going back to the basics is sometimes exactly what is needed to cope with stress. 

Power Up for Back to School

Introducing: Back to School Series for Families

 

Going back to school in the midst of a pandemic can be stressful on the entire family. We’re partnering with several local organizations (DYEnamic Instruction, Guilford County Partnership for Children, United Way, YWCA High Point) to offer a 3-program series supporting families as they transition from summer mode to school mode. Join us on Facebook from 12-1 pm on Monday, August 10, 17, and 24,  and ask your question live!

Coping with Stress During Tough Times: Tip 2

Developed by HRI Program Coordinator, Camila Dos Santos, M.Ed.

Tip 2: Find 2-3 routines or practices that comfort you when your emotions are at a high. 

When things are tough, it’s important to have a couple of stress-relief practices that comfort you.  Whether your go-to is active like kick-boxing or yoga, creative, like painting or restoring a piece of furniture, contemplative such as meditation or journaling, or a combination of these and others, it’s important to know what works for you when things are particularly difficult.